Fresh Falls Festival 2011 Info

ATTENTION PARTY PEOPLE! READ THE FOLLOWING ANNOUNCEMENT!

Just added to this year’s line-up are:

Californians Grouplove (USA) are coming back to our shores to play tunes from their debut album Never Trust a Happy Song. The sunnier-than-thou five-piece will bring their energy, part psychedelic-rock, part pop, part art-rock and part gypsy punk tunes to the stage.

Auckland’s guitar-gilded electro pop act The Naked & Famous (NZ) will be spreading their dreamy 80’s synth soundscapes across the Falls landscapes. With hits ‘Young Blood’ and ‘Punching In A Dream,’ from their debut Passive Me, Aggressive You, which recently won them 6 New Zealand Music Award nominations.

The Scientists of Modern Music (AUS) is a band with a unique image; their calling card is their matching black and white suit onstage getup. If they are in fact attempting their best Oreo impression, it could be argued that their beats and breakdowns are just as crunchy and delicious. After touring with The Presets they took a brief hiatus, but they are back on the curriculum this summer.

The following artists will be featured onstage in Lorne only:

Bleeding Knees Club (AUS) – This Goldcoast two-piece deal in trashy, surf punk tunes. Having a huge 2011, they recently signed with the US label IAMSOUND Records, home to acts like Florence & the Machine and debuted their video clip for ‘Teenage Girls’ online with Rolling Stone US.

Boy In A Box (AUS), the brainchild of precociously talented Melbournite Tobias Priddle are about to become your new favourite band. Triple J hits like “Moon Comes Up” and “The Longest Road” have propelled Tobias and his razor sharp 3 piece into an enviable position.

A nine-piece affair, Clairy Browne & The Bangin’ Rackettes (AUS) have been tearing around the nation with their infectious 60’s influenced jams. Touring with The Cat Empire and playing their own shows, they know how to make everyone shake and groove.

Able to create huge sonic atmospheres using just his voice and a loop pedal and moving between hip-hop reggae and drum and bass rhythms with the greatest of ease is Dub FX (AUS). With over 30 million youtube views, he’s proved to be a global master in live looping.

Guineafowl (AUS) – the Sydney group that thrives on indietronic tunes with a hint of drama and joy rarely seen in their namesakes’ strain of birdlife. They released their first EP entitled Hello Anxiety earlier this year, and it is a mix of catchy indie guitar riffs and drum and bass-like percussions and samples.

In India it is said that the mere sight of the Gyuto Monks of Tibet (TIB) is a blessing, but to hear the sound of their chanting is to be transformed. To bear witness to their ceremony is to be privy to something truly special – both musically and spiritually.

Kim Churchill (AUS) was a born guitarist, starting at the age of 4 and never dropping the axe since. From street performances to most recently touring with Michael Franti it has been all systems go for Australia’s newest roots hero.

Lewis Floyd Henry (UK), the blues-wailing, one-man-band busker from South-East London, with the wild Hendrix hair and smart Mod suit has made his way into the festival circuits. With his debut album One Man And His 30w Pram, released in February he’s taking it across the world and is stopping in at Falls.

Miles Kane (UK), best known for his role alongside Alex Turner (Arctic Monkeys) in The Last Shadow Puppets, has released his debut solo record Colour Of The Trap which confirms in spectacular fashion his talents as an artist. After touring with Arctic Monkeys in 2011, he’s been nominated for the breakthrough artist gong at this year’s UK Q Awards.

Melbournites the Puta Madre Brothers (AUS) call themselves the “world’s only surviving triple one-man band” and their eye-popping, over-heated set is something that needs to be seen to be believed. As they wail away in poorly learned faux Spanish, they’ll put a smile on your face and make you dance like a lunatic.

Unique and refreshing are The Bombay Royale (AUS), they’re reinterpreting the works of some of India’s finest 1960’s and 70’s Bollywood musicians. This is the 21st Century though, and they most definitely possess the skills to play the modern bills.

 

 

 

Will

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